Thursday, November 30, 2017

1 in 4 LGBTI people report discrimination in 2016 - SPECIAL REPORT

A disturbing report was issued by the Center for American Progress about LGBTI discrimination. 1 in 4 LGBT people report experiencing discrimination in 2016.

"This is clearly unacceptable and we must eliminate the Kentucky Religious Freedom Act. We call on the Kentucky Supreme Court to overturn this legislation which is effectively a license to discriminate," stated Jordan Palmer, secretary-general of Kentucky Equality Federation, Marriage Equality Kentucky, Southeastern Kentucky Stop Hate Group, Be Proud - Western Kentucky, Kentucky HIV Advocacy Campaign, Kentucky Equal Ballot Access, and others combined together in the Earth Equality Alliance.

Over the past decade, the nation has made unprecedented progress toward LGBTI equality. But to date, neither the federal government nor most states (including the Commonwealth of Kentucky - http://kentucky.gov) have explicit statutory nondiscrimination laws protecting people on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. LGBTI people still face widespread discrimination: Between 11 percent and 28 percent of LGBTI workers report losing a promotion simply because of their sexual orientation, and 27 percent of transgender workers report being fired, not hired, or denied a promotion in the past year. Discrimination also routinely affects LGBTI people beyond the workplace, sometimes costing them their homes, access to education, and even the ability to engage in public life.

Data from a nationally representative survey of LGBTI people conducted by CAP shows that 25.2 percent of LGBTI respondents has experienced discrimination because of their sexual orientation or gender identity in the past year. The January 2017 survey shows that, despite progress, in 2016 discrimination remained a widespread threat to LGBTI people’s well-being, health, and economic security.

Among people who experienced sexual orientation- or gender-identity-based discrimination in the past year:
  • 68.5 percent reported that discrimination at least somewhat negatively affected their psychological well-being. 
  • 43.7 percent reported that discrimination negatively impacted their physical well-being. 
  • 47.7 percent reported that discrimination negatively impacted their spiritual well-being. 
  • 38.5 percent reported discrimination negatively impacted their school environment. 
  • 52.8 percent reported that discrimination negatively impacted their work environment. 
  • 56.6 report it negatively impacted their neighborhood and community environment. 

Unseen harms
LGBTI people who don’t experience overt discrimination, such as being fired from a job, may still find that the threat of it shapes their lives in subtle but profound ways. David M., a gay man, works at a Fortune 500 company with a formal, written nondiscrimination policy. “I couldn’t be fired for being gay,” he said. But David went on to explain, “When partners at the firm invite straight men to squash or drinks, they don’t invite the women or gay men. I’m being passed over for opportunities that could lead to being promoted.”

“I’m trying to minimize the bias against me by changing my presentation in the corporate world,” he added. “I lower my voice in meetings to make it sound less feminine and avoid wearing anything but a black suit. … When you’re perceived as feminine—whether you’re a woman or a gay man—you get excluded from relationships that improve your career.”

David is not alone. Survey findings and related interviews show that LGBTI people hide personal relationships, delay health care, change the way they dress, and take other steps to alter their lives because they could be discriminated against.

Maria S., a lesbian who lives in North Carolina, described a long commute from her home in Durham to a different town where she works. She makes the drive every day so that she can live in a city that’s friendly to LGBTI people. She loves her job, but she’s not out to her boss. “I wonder whether I would be let go if the higher-ups knew about my sexuality,” she says.

CAP’s research shows that stories such as Maria’s and David’s are common. The below table shows the percentage of LGBTI people who report changing their lives in a variety of ways in order to avoid discrimination.

Click to make larger.
Click to make larger.

As Table 1 shows, LGBTI people who’ve experienced discrimination in the past year are significantly more likely to alter their lives for fear of discrimination, even deciding where to live and work because of it, suggesting that there are lasting consequences for victims of discrimination. Yet findings also support the contention that LGBTI people do not need to have experienced discrimination in order to act in ways that help them avoid it, which is in line with empirical evidence on a component of minority stress theory: expectations of rejection.

Not only can threatened discrimination bar LGBTI people from living authentically—it can also deny them material opportunities. Rafael J.,* a gay student in California, told CAP that he “decided to apply to law schools only in LGBTI-safe cities or states,” denying him the opportunity pursue his graduate education at schools he might otherwise have applied to. “I did not think I would be safe being an openly gay man,” he said. “Especially a gay man of color, in some places.”

Unique vulnerabilities in the workplace
Within the LGBTI community, people who were vulnerable to discrimination across multiple identities reported uniquely high rates of avoidance behaviors.

In particular, LGBTI people of color were more likely to hide their sexual orientation and gender identity from employers, with 12 percent removing items from their resumes—in comparison to 8 percent of white LGBTI respondents—in the past year.

Similarly, 18.7 percent of 18- to 24-year-old LGBTI respondents reported removing items from their resumes—in comparison to 7.9 percent of 35- to 44-year-olds.

Meanwhile, 15.5 percent of disabled LGBTI respondents reported removing items from their resume—in comparison to 7.3 percent of nondisabled LGBTI people. This finding may reflect higher rates of unemployment among people of color, disabled people, and young adults; it may also reflect that LGBTI people who could also face discrimination on the basis of their race, youth, and disability feel uniquely vulnerable to being denied a job due to discrimination, or a combination of factors.

Unique vulnerabilities in the public square
Discrimination, harassment, and violence against LGBTI people—especially transgender people—has always been common in places of public accommodation, such as hotels, restaurants, or government offices. The 2015 United States Transgender Survey found that, among transgender people who visited a place of public accommodation where staff knew or believed they were transgender, nearly one in three experienced discrimination or harassment—including being denied equal services or even being physically attacked.

In March 2016, then North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory signed H.B. 2 into law, which mandated anti-transgender discrimination in single-sex facilities—and began an unprecedented attack on transgender people’s access to public accommodations and ability to participate in public life.

That year, more than 30 bills specifically targeting transgender people’s access to public accommodations were introduced in state legislatures across the country. This survey asked transgender respondents whether they had avoided places of public accommodation from January 2016 through January 2017, during a nationwide attack on transgender people’s rights.

Among transgender survey respondents:
  • 25.7 percent reported avoiding public places such as stores and restaurants, versus 9.9 percent of cisgender LGBTI respondents 
  • 10.9 percent reported avoiding public transportation, versus 4.1 percent of cisgender LGBTI respondents 
  • 11.9 percent avoided getting services they or their family needed, versus 4.4 percent of cisgender LGBTI respondents 
  • 26.7 percent made specific decisions about where to shop, versus 6.6 percent of cisgender LGBTI respondents These findings suggest that ongoing discrimination in public accommodations pushes transgender people out of public life, making it harder for them to access key services, use public transportation, or simply go to stores or restaurants without fear of discrimination. 

Disabled LGBTI people were also significantly more likely to avoid public places than their nondisabled LGBTI counterparts. Among disabled LGBTI survey respondents, in the past year:

  • 20.4 percent reported avoiding public places such as stores and restaurants, versus 9.1 percent of nondisabled LGBTI respondents
  • 8.8 percent reported avoiding public transportation, versus 3.6 percent of nondisabled LGBTI respondents
  • 14.7 percent avoided getting services they or their family needed, versus 2.9 percent of nondisabled LGBTI respondents
  • 25.7 percent made specific decisions about where to shop, versus 15.4 percent of nondisabled LGBTI respondents


This is likely because, in addition to the risk of anti-LGBTI harassment and discrimination, LGBTI people with disabilities contend with inaccessible public spaces. For example, many transit agencies fail to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, requirements that would make public transportation accessible to people with visual and cognitive disabilities.

Unique vulnerabilities in health care 
In 2010, more than half of LGBTI people reported being discriminated against by a health care providers and more than 25 percent of transgender respondents reported being refused medical care outright. Since then, LGBTI people have gained protections from health care discrimination—most notably, regulations stemming from the Affordable Care Act, or ACA, have prohibited federally funded hospitals, providers, and insurers from discriminating against LGBTI patients. Despite progress, LGBTI people, and transgender people in particular, remain vulnerable to healthcare discrimination: In 2015, one-third of transgender people who saw a health care provider reported “at least one negative experience related to being transgender.” These negative experiences included being refused treatment or even being physically assaulted. Transgender people of color and people with disabilities reported particularly high rates of discrimination from health care providers.

Unsurprisingly, people in these vulnerable groups are especially likely to avoid doctor’s offices, postponing both preventative and needed medical care:
  • 23.5 percent of transgender respondents avoided doctors’ offices in the past year, versus 4.4 percent of cisgender LGBTI respondents 
  • 13.7 percent of disabled LGBTI respondents avoided doctors’ offices in the past year, versus 4.2 percent of nondisabled LGBTI respondents 
  • 10.3 percent of LGBTI people of color avoided doctors’ offices in the past year, versus 4.2 percent of white LGBTI respondents 

These findings are consistent with research that has also identified patterns of health care discrimination against people of color and disabled people. For example, one survey of health care practices in five major cities found that more than one in five practices were inaccessible to patients who used wheelchairs.

A call to action 
To ensure that civil rights laws explicitly protect LGBTI people, Congress and all States should pass an Equality Act, a comprehensive bill banning discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity in employment, public accommodations, housing, credit, and federal funding, among other provisions.

*Authors’ note:  All names have been changed out of respect for interviewees’ privacy.

Methodology 
To conduct this study, CAP commissioned and designed a survey, fielded by Knowledge Networks, which surveyed 1,864 individuals about their experiences with health insurance and health care. Among the respondents, 857 identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender, while 1,007 identified as heterosexual and cisgender/nontransgender. Respondents came from all income ranges and are diverse across factors such as race, ethnicity, education, geography, disability status, and age. The survey was fielded online in English in January 2017 to coincide with the fourth open enrollment period through the health insurance marketplaces and the beginning of the first full year of federal rules that specifically protect LGBT people from discrimination in health insurance coverage and health care. The data are nationally representative and weighted according to U.S. population characteristics. All reported findings are statistically significant unless otherwise indicated. All comparisons presented are statistically significant at the p < .05 level.

Separate from the quantitative survey, the authors solicited stories exploring the impact of discrimination on LGBT people’s lives. Using social media platforms, the study authors requested volunteers to anonymously recount personal experiences of changing their behavior or making other adjustments to their daily lives to prevent experiencing discrimination. Interviews were conducted by one of the study authors and names were changed to protect the identity of the interviewee.

Additional information about study methods and materials are available from the authors.

Friday, October 13, 2017

Governor Bevin needs Education on Medical Marijuana

Governor Matt Bevin needs to be educated on medical marijuana. "The news article 'Marijuana Overdoses Kill 37 in Colorado On First Day of Legalization' was a hoax, but the Governor isn't well read enough to realize this. By the time the commonwealth legalizes medical marijuana, it will be too late for Kentuckians to benefit from it," stated Kentucky Equality Federation Secretary-General Jordan Palmer.

"'People will drive when they are stoned' some say, well, in Kentucky, it is illegal to #drive on high blood pressure medication, pain medication, etc. so they are already driving stoned. I am however pleased the Governor gave us a way to remedy the situation by stating 'as long as I am Governor' well, thankfully we will have an election soon enough."

"We are sick of big brother and government telling the unemployed what they can and cannot do to earn a living. Marijuana addiction is rare, the chances are greater to become an alcoholic. Marijuana cannot lead to a fatal overdose, and it is not a gateway drug. I hope the Kentucky House of Representatives and the Kentucky Senate will pass the legislation and should the Governor veto it, I pray they override his veto. The mentality of the Bevin Administration is to be last at everything, and unemployment isn't on their minds; thousands of unemployed coal miners could easier become marijuana farmers."

"Again we have an Administration in Frankfort, Kentucky that doesn't care about the Southern Region of the Commonwealth. I had much rather our youth use marijuana as a recreational drug than cocaine or crystal meth."

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

United States votes against LGBTI civil rights at the United Nations

The U.S. on voted against a United Nations Human Rights Council resolution that condemns the #death penalty for those found guilty of committing consensual same-sex sexual acts.

Still, the resolution — which Belgium, Benin, Costa Rica, France, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia and Switzerland introduced — passed by a 27-13 vote margin.

This leaves nation-states that execute LGBTI people open for sanctions or refusal of aid from the United Nations at the discretion of Secretary-General of the United Nations.

Col. Jordan Palmer with Kentucky Equality Federation and Marriage Equality Kentucky, called the U.S. vote shameful, but not unlike similar resolutions the U.S. also sided with Russia, Iran, and Egypt in the past.

"America will never be “great” again until we deal with human rights," Palmer stated.

Kelly Currie, the U.S. representative to the U.N. Economic and Social Council, attended the event but did NOT speak.

Former U.S. Vice President Biden is among those who spoke at last year’s U.N. LGBT Core Group event.

U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley (former Governor of the State of South Carolina) in April said the U.S. remains “disturbed” by the ongoing crackdown against gay men and lesbians in Chechnya.

Friday, June 23, 2017

#KY #CA California extending travel ban to include Kentucky

The Earth Equality Alliance, Kentucky Equality Federation, and Marriage Equality Kentucky (an alliance of more than eight (8) organizations with a common spokesperson and unifying secretary-general) today commented on the California Attorney General adding the Commonwealth of Kentucky to its travel ban.

After the passage of Kentucky Senate Bill 17, Kentucky Equality Federation promised to sue should a student suffer from discrimination as a result of the law, as reported by the Lexington Herald-Leader.

# # #
CONTACT:
Dillan Marsh, Executive Director
Secretary General Jordan Palmer's Office of Special Affairs
PH: (502) 219-2533
 # # #

"Fanatics are now trying to turn religious freedom into a license to discriminate and it will not be tolerated,” stated Secretary-General Jordan Palmer.

“Kentucky Equality Federation and its attorneys have never lost a lawsuit, from NKU, Hazard, to the Warren County Detention Center to striking down Kentucky’s same-sex marriage ban by a Kentucky judge. We are eager to sink our teeth into what fanatics are twisting as so-called religious freedom. Perhaps it is the religious belief of someone to sell they're first born female child into slavery, but that person would also be convicted of a criminal act and this is much the same.

The freedom of religion gives you permission to worship as you see fit as per the constitution of this Commonwealth. If someone believes that isn't the definition of religious freedom, then they do not understand the meaning of it. But, religious freedom is commonly understood.

No law may supersede the Constitution, even with a ballot outcome (see Kentucky Equality Federation v. Governor Steve Beshear)."

Section V of the Commonwealth's Constitution states (bold emphases added):

No preference shall ever be given by law to any religious sect, society or denomination; nor to any particular creed, mode of worship or system of ecclesiastical polity; nor shall any person be compelled to attend any place of worship, to contribute to the erection or maintenance of any such place, or to the salary or support of any minister of religion; nor shall any man be compelled to send his child to any school to which he may be conscientiously opposed; and the civil rights, privileges or capacities of no person shall be taken away, or in anywise diminished or enlarged, on account of his belief or disbelief of any religious tenet, dogma or teaching. No human authority shall, in any case whatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience.

Palmer continued: “The Kentucky Constitution guarantees freedom of religion as intended, that neither the commonwealth nor any power shared with the federal government, shall ever force a religious belief on its citizens or force them to attend any particular religious services.”

The travel ban was first put into effect January 1 when state measure AB 1887 became law. The law says California is "a leader in protecting civil rights and preventing discrimination" and should not support or finance "discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people."

The California travel ban included Tennessee, North Carolina, Mississippi and Kansas, and now included Alabama, Kentucky, and Texas.

This will also have a great impact on sports.

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Condemnation of Black Youth Project Statements: "Keep your white friends and partners away from Black Pride events," and "When white people enter a space, anti-Blackness always does too"

SPECIAL STATEMENT
SECRETARY-GENERAL JORDAN PALMER

Condemnation of Black Youth Project Statements: "Keep your white friends and partners away from Black Pride events," and "When white people enter a space, anti-Blackness always does too"

LEXINGTON, KY -- #Pride #AllLivesMatter #DefendEquality The Kentucky Equality Federation, the American Federation of NGO’s, and their member organizations recognize the renewed energy of activists in the Trump era, but we must act with tact and skill and resist a relapse to what Trump represents, especially to the LGBTI, Black, Latino communities and Women. Additionally, we will not permit so-called Right Wing ‘Christian’ fundamentalism to conquer and divide us. We shall stand tall and walk tall, united in love and friendship, that is the biggest threat we represent to the current era, but we shall not falter, we will prevail. Love and friendship are stronger than hate and prejudice.

However, we must strongly condemn the recent Black Youth Project communication titled “Keep your white friends and partners away from Black Pride events,” and “When white people enter a space, anti-Blackness always does too,” and they call for segregationism and racism in the LGBTI community and the same between White and Black America.

The use of the word queer is also condemned and vehemently rejected, by the brain fart organization (credit to Bruce A. Dixon of the Black Agenda Report for the use of the name ‘Brain Fart’ when describing this organization) and its sub-units; I am not a queer nor a fag, but I am gay.

The statements of Hari Zared and the parent, Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100) a non-government organization (NGO) identified as being part of, or the power behind, #BlackLivesMatter.

In the published articles, the Black Youth Project dismisses #jurisprudence, coalition building with other communities, and is constantly bombarding our Black youth with anti-Black articles, pictures, and opinions attempting to ‘conquer and divide.’

The true mentality of these articles is pure racism, bigotry, and hate.

Additionally, I will attend whatever events I so desire. The information these organizations are bombarding our youth with is an offense to individual rights, with delusions of being politically correct or remotely accurate.

LGBTI pride belongs to all members of the community, including our Black family. We must continue to pursue acceptance within our efforts, rather than seeking to segregate them. It is unthinkable that this brain fart organization and its subunits would seek to divide the community, down to individual partners and relationships, using racism as a weapon.

This year, the broader LGBTI community finds itself under more pressure and attacks than it has been since the dawn of the marriage equality struggle, nearly two decades ago. Now is a time for us to all stand firmly together. When we divide due to pettiness and prejudice, the forces of inequality and intolerance gain an advantage against all of us.

We will not be shoved back in the closet, and we will most certainly never allow it to be done because of neo-segregationism in our midst. We can overcome with love, but we must do so together and reject the offensive rhetoric of brain fart organizations who teach hatred and racism.

People from all walks of life are welcome at LGBTI pride events, united in love and friendship.

#GayLivesMatter, #AllLivesMatter, #WhiteLivesMatter, #BlackLivesMatter, and to use the Flag of the Races (also called the Flag of the Human Race) #RedLivesMatter, #WhiteLivesMatter, #BrownLivesMatter, #YellowLivesMatter, #BlackLivesMatter. The Flag of the Human Race has five horizontal stripes (from top to bottom they were red, white, brown, yellow, and black). This is said to be the inspiration behind #TheFreedomFlag, also called #NewGlory, and #PrideFlag, created by #GilbertBaker who passed away earlier this year.